Windows 7 EOL

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Comments

  • edited July 16

    Well, it is somewhat old. Think of 7 the same way you thought of 98 in 2008. There are newer and somewhat better non-Microsoft things out there.

  • @robobox said:
    There are newer and somewhat better things out there.

    Sadly, Windows 10 isn't one of them. That feels more like a regression to me.

  • @robobox said:
    Well, it is pretty old.

    Wheels are pretty old, but for some reason people keep using those. Those Canadian square wheels should have sold like hotcakes just for being "new".

  • edited July 16

    I view 7 more like I did XP in 2011: a market-leading OS product with solid software support. Hardware support would have been the same if M$ hadn't "compelled" Intel to give up on Windows 7.

    Those Canadian square wheels should have sold like hotcakes just for being "new".

    Where have you been? They came out six weeks ago! The new thing is the WiFi and touch-enabled pentagonal wheel with Windows 10 IoT. Can someone give me a push out of my driveway?

  • @SomeGuy said:
    Wheels are pretty old, but for some reason people keep using those. Those Canadian square wheels should have sold like hotcakes just for being "new".

    Good point. However by “newer and somewhat better things”, I meant many of those non-Microsoft OSes out there. :P

  • @win32
    I wouldn't be surprised if we had Win10 iot wheels, with the way things are going.
    Oh and iot connected vehicles. With all new telemetry collecting information about where, when, how you drive to deliver superior advertising to your car.
    With the additional bonus of a more easily hacked vehicle.

  • 10 years is pretty ancient in the technology world.

    It's definitely pretty old at this point. It was good for the time, but that time has passed.

  • Ok, I actually put my money where my mouth is with the Linux statement. It's perfectly usable nowadays. Hell, I even like Gnome 3.

    It's a lot more realistic than limping into 2019 with an OS from 1999.

  • @yourepicfailure said:
    @win32
    I wouldn't be surprised if we had Win10 iot wheels, with the way things are going.
    Oh and iot connected vehicles. With all new telemetry collecting information about where, when, how you drive to deliver superior advertising to your car.
    With the additional bonus of a more easily hacked vehicle.

    Telemetry in vehicles is a thing. Has been for a while. My father's 2010 Ford F-150 periodically runs these "vehicle history reports" and sends them off to who knows where. It's a Microsoft SYNC system.

  • Yes, but for advertising. With all those fancy big screens in vehicles and all sorts of connectivity, it is only a matter of when that telemetry will be used for profit.

  • I wonder if Windows 7 will share the same fate as Windows XP. Extended support ends in 2020 but people continue to use for 5 more years.

  • Definitely. As I said earlier it is doing better than XP at preserving its market share.

  • @Windows99SE said:
    Extended support ends in 2020 but people continue to use for 5 more years.

    Only thing is that if people happen to use Professional or Enterprise, they have to pay (until 2023, and of the cost to rise over time). All other editions are left defenceless unless one can try with the POSReady updates but only until 2021.

  • and the paid support is only available for volume licence holders, not home users.

  • @Windows99SE said:
    I wonder if Windows 7 will share the same fate as Windows XP. Extended support ends in 2020 but people continue to use for 5 more years.

    I think so. Windows 7 is as great as XP in terms of popularity. After all, people say that Windows 7 brought a "new wave of GUI phases" and stuff like that. But everyone always has to upgrade their stuff at some point :)

  • edited July 23

    To me, 7 will always look like a blander Vista.
    Only during its development when it had that beautiful overlay blur colorization across everything composited and had the colorful auroras everywhere did I find it attractive. (build 6730)
    RTM 7 only has that overlay colorizing on inactive windows and resorts to a more Vista-like colorization for active windows.

  • edited September 1

    Because Windows 10 is no good, it deserves a true successor (e.g. Microsoft Windows Tabs) and on BD-ROM!
    On the other hand, Windows 7 Forever!

  • Well today, Windows 7 is 10 years old. And also, three months left of it. What else can I say?

  • Wow, 10 years old. Hard to believe. I remember being excited for it - no more Vista! Now, looking back, Vista SP2 wasn't half bad, but by then it was too late.

  • The day after launch, I fell off a slippery ladder and fractured my left arm, then I read a magazine clipping which claimed that the OS would come out in 2010. I was like "something in the western world was finished ahead of schedule for once!".

    However, the OS and its UI seemed so distant to me as I never really touched Vista and win2k was still common in local businesses.

    I didn't get to use W7 until about a year later and it only replaced XP as my main Windows OS in 2014.

  • For me, I didn't use 7 until late 2011, which would be almost eight years. To be honest, I had avoided anything Vista/7 before this as I was most comfortable with XP, plus also the fact I didn't appreciate the features they had then (even the graphics, as I found they were too "glossy" for my liking). When my old computer broke down after having just two years of it, I was very reluctant on having no choice but to get a new system with 7. After a few teething problems here and there, I got used to it and adored it since. However, I don't expect the same thing with 10 even though I became more familiar with it through college computers.

  • I tried 7 pretty early on. I don't remember if I used any previews / betas or just waited until the RTM release. But I definitely liked it better than Vista. It felt more polished and less sluggish and I initially tried it on my Thinkpad T40, so the fact that it was able to run decently on that was impressive. I had tried Vista on the same hardware and it didn't even last a day as it was so slow and unusable.

    7 was definitely a welcome release at that time because XP was aging and no one wanted to use Vista. So on new builds, you were left with the choice of either installing an outdated OS or a new OS that the user was probably going to complain about. But when 7 was released, public opinion was more favorable. So you could finally install a modern and supported OS on new hardware and users would be happy.

  • edited October 24

    Hmm, quite the opposite for me on my x41T.

    Performance wise, 7 would go "Woo, oh" and start bogging down pretty quick thanks to the power of the 3600rpm drive. Aka spiking. Vista held a steady mediocre performance.
    Bootup was also slower under 7. Lastly, explorer took noticeably longer to load folders with over 30 files.

    Then again Vista performed much worse than Xp, no denying that, and I found myself going right back to Xp TPC after a month of Vista. Before I finally shelved the thing a year later for a Latitude XT.

    Machine was a 1.6ghz version with 2.5gb ram.

  • @yourepicfailure said:
    Performance wise, 7 would go "Woo, oh" and start bogging down pretty quick thanks to the power of the 3600rpm drive.

    3600 RPM drive?? I didn't think they made them that slow in a very long time, except for maybe an iPod. I thought the slowest speed you could get was 4200 RPM.

    I've had mixed results regarding speed. On some machines, Vista was faster. On others, Windows 7 was faster. For both, I've found that on low-end systems it's best to disable Windows Search (indexing service), Superfetch, and System Protection (aka System Restore). Windows Search and System Protection love using the HDD, and even when doing light tasks like word processing, the HDD light would constantly be on. Superfetch just made the machine feel sluggish after a while unless you gave it heaps of RAM to play with (4GB or more).

  • It's now two months to go until everything ends but, I've got this quirky thought in mind... in @win32's thread about modernising Windows 2000, one of the Power Tools can let you change the OS environment (which is "Force Version Setting Tool"). Now recently, I'm thinking if that would natively work under 7 and if it can, I can set that to Windows 2000 or below, in the way to give it extra "protection" against malware and other bad stuff (because by my reckoning, cyber criminals don't make things for these OSes anymore).

    Not sure if that's the best way to bulletproof the OS for those that refuse to upgrade but hey, just an idea.

  • That wouldn't work on anything above Server 2003. And I heard that Windows may have difficulty booting if used on NT 6.x. (either that or just doing nothing)

  • @win32 said:
    And I heard that Windows may have difficulty booting if used on NT 6.x. (either that or just doing nothing)

    I normally hiberate my system, unless that would be affected also.

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