HP Photosmart M307

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Comments

  • @SomeGuy said:
    If you really want a working camera of this model, another one will probably turn up on eBay for a few bucks eventually.

    No, I just wanted the model that I already had to just work and take pictures, that's all. Oh and video too. It's unfortunate that I couldn't get outside shots out of the camera since it spazzed out on me. I tried to see if I could get it working again but it didn't. So, it's over.

  • edited February 4

    After 3 months or so, I am back. I am gonna try to get this camera back to working again. I abandoned it for a couple months until I took it out today and that was when I realized that I was retarded a SECOND FUCKING TIME! Not only there were alkaline batteries in the battery compartment, but they were leaking! The negative end of the batteries had corrosion on the sides so I threw it away like it should've been a long time ago. Fortunately nothing happened to the battery compartment. I also should mention that when I was trying to restore this camera for the last time I got frustrated and angry I had to take my anger out on it. I damaged it just a little bit but yeah. I know. But I had to do it. I'm not expecting it to 100% work or anything, but I wanna give it a try. And if I do, great, if I don't, well I am gonna stop and put it back in the drawer that it was at before.

  • Great news guys I got it to work without much of a chore. I charged the batteries, put them in, tried to turn it on multiple times, and it worked. But the bad news is that the black screen thing like how the images the camera takes are black is still there.

    I guess it's time to update the firmware! Also for anyone wondering, there is nothing in there. No data is present. It got formatted somehow months earlier.

  • I updated the firmware, version 1.11. However it still has that black screen thing so I am not sure what's going on... I'll work on it later.

  • edited February 5

    I am pretty sure the camera lens or something has been misplaced inside the camera. Fortunately the camera was kind enough to let me grab the image I took. Here is the image, you can see a few spots and lighting around the corners, so this tells me that something is wrong with the gears of the camera lens thing.
    https://forum.winworldpc.com/uploads/editor/gp/y8dhm8hzf2zn.jpg

  • edited February 5

    I'm not sure how to fix the black screen solution. I tried changing batteries, formatting memory, and nothing has worked so far.

  • Hmm, that does suggest a mechanical problem like the shutter not opening or a sensor not adjusting for light.

  • edited February 6

    Point and shoot digitals have no physical shutter to reduce manufacturing costs and decrease weight.
    They instead use the "electronic shutter" feature of the sensor. OP's camera uses a CCD. So in this case, for a CCD the electronic shutter prevents a charge from building up from the photons. The charge, when scanned back by the circuitry, resembles the image.
    Possibly the aperture could be shot, however there would be at least light in the center and not on the corners.

    Nonetheless a signal is not reaching the CCD. Because driving a CCD is no easy task, there are typically several ICs that
    A) provide power to the CCD
    B ) Provide drive signals to the CCD (typically an FPGA or CPLD to reduce load on processor)
    C) Amplify signals going to and from the CCD
    D) And a couple of DACs

    These images should show you how much circuitry is required to simply drive one. The power supply to run the CCD is not shown and neither is image processing. This is not the CCD in OP's camera.

    This is a 35mm full-frame sensor. It is no doubt significantly larger than OP's requiring a larger drive board design. However, it should still give you an idea of the complexity involved.

    So there is a lot that could go wrong electronically. If a camera lens was misplaced, you would still have a image, but it would be off. Judging by the fact that there is noise, there is something. If it isn't a pain, I'd like to see a few more pictures. Point it at a very very bright light source and a very very dim source. I'm trying to see if the noise patterns change.

    EDIT: slightly modified post, some character combinations were producing unwanted emojis.
    Also added some clarification.

  • edited February 6

    @yourepicfailure said:
    I'd like to see a few more pictures. Point it at a very very bright light source and a very very >dim source. I'm trying to see if the noise patterns change.

    Here you go.
    I took one picture close to a light bulb and one in darkness. I can't see any difference here maybe other than a few pixels.

  • Also since fixing this black screen thing is gonna take some time, I decided to test out the embedded audio on a image and extracted it... It sounded pretty horrible to be honest. It was loud, it was choppy and it skipped alot. I'm not sure why though.

  • @yourepicfailure said:
    Point and shoot digitals have no physical shutter to reduce manufacturing costs and decrease weight.

    I was actually thinking of the outer protective "shutter" that acts as a lenscap. Whatever it is called. At least my thing-a-majig has that. But that would be fairly obvious if that were not working.

  • Alright, good and bad.

    Good is, the noise patterns are 90% identical. This means that the sync and read signals are good. How do I know this?
    Like a display panel, solid state image sensors have dead pixels. The sensor also has more reactive pixels as well. The dead pixels either always output the same charge or none at all. The camera designers know this, and program the image processor to work around it. In this case, the debayering algorithm takes this into account during the averaging to "Rebuild" the image. Since there is no light surrounding the pixel, the averaging creates a fading dot.
    So, since the patterns are identical, this means those are the dead pixels. In addition to the fact that the sensor is being read correctly as they are in the same exact spot.

    Bad is,
    This indicates something is prohibiting the sensor from building a charge. Which one (top or bottom) is the one pointed at the light bulb?

    @SomeGuy
    Oh, yes that. I do apologize if I appear condescending or trying to make you feel dumb.
    But as you can see, I have a very hefty knowledge about imaging systems and I sometimes get carried away.

  • edited February 7

    @yourepicfailure said:
    Bad is,
    This indicates something is prohibiting the sensor from building a charge. Which one (top or bottom) is the one pointed at the light bulb?

    Something is prohibiting the sensor from building a charge? What could it be? Could it be the batteries? Something internal?

    Also top image is the lightbulb, bottom is darkness.

  • I also found out that my files get corrupted when I connect the USB while the camera is on. So I have to turn off the camera after saving my images, connect the USB, turn the camera on then transfer the files.

    Since the camera had an EV compensation option, I put it to max then took another picture. It looks like there is some light in the top-left corner.

  • edited February 7

    To tell you the truth, this is something that really belongs on Photrio Digital.
    https://www.photrio.com/forum/forums/digital-cameras-and-capture.360/

    I've been going off of what I know, but I've been stretched thin at this point.
    I don't know what more to say without opening or physically seeing/holding the camera.

    I wouldn't expect a pleasant response beyond what we've given.

  • @yourepicfailure said:
    To tell you the truth, this is something that really belongs on Photrio Digital.
    https://www.photrio.com/forum/forums/digital-cameras-and-capture.360/

    I've been going off of what I know, but I've been stretched thin at this point.
    I don't know what more to say without opening or physically seeing/holding the camera.

    I wouldn't expect a pleasant response beyond what we've given.

    Oh ok.

  • edited February 8

    Well I guess it is over then.

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