Windows 3.0 / 3.1 3.1

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  • @OrdinaryRBLXPlayer said:
    How do I install the Windows 3.1 [English for Central-Eastern Europe] (1993)?

    You do A: in the dos prompt if its a floppy disk or find the drive you put windows in.
    You type "setup"

  • SHA1 checksums are not matching for:

    Windows 3.1 (Retail) (3.5-1.44mb)
    Windows 3.1 (OEM) (5.25-1.2mb)

    I offered all of them.
    At least SHA1 is correct, because I dumped them and compared with another uploaded one.

  • So...

    3.2 is just a Chinese version?
    Huh.

  • i have a cd rom version

  • edited January 2019

    Unlike Windows 3.0 setup, which runs as a Windows application, Windows 3.1x setup runs in the NTVDM, and tries to "upgrade" Windows 2000 by attempting to install in my system32 folder.

    The setup.inf in 3.1x is quite powerful and interesting, with slipstreaming potential for basic applications and drivers.

    The only Windows 3.x CD-ROMs that exist would be ones made by OEMs (like Tandy for 3.0 MME) or as part of machine-specific restore CDs (again OEM).

  • Whats wrong with the archive files? They do not contain floppy disks, but when I opened two of them all the files that are likely parts of the floppies are already in the folder. Can anyone please help to install an archive file from here?

  • edited October 2019

    @JonathonWyble said:

    @Winworldpc Fan 9000 said:

    @SomeGuy said:
    No. "3.2" is Chinese only.

    unless you change the system language

    Well, like BF10 said, you can translate the entire system to English using a language driver in your hypervisor, but that can screw everything up, such as the word fonts.

    A simple way to anglicise Windows 3.2 is to run it with Calmira 3.3.
    This is The Red China version.

  • That is because Calmira II is in English. Most of the underlying programs are still in Chinese.

  • I have got a windows 3.1 iso,how to upload it?

  • Windows 3.1 was never released on CD-ROM. If you have an ISO, it is fake garbage and we don't need it.

  • edited January 26

    I've installed and run on the following minimum IBM PC AT 5170.

    CPU : 80286-6
    BIOS : 01/10/84
    DOS : IBM PC-DOS 3.10 (It can't be installed or run on IBM PC DOS 3.00)
    RAM : 1MB (512KB on board + 512KB on expansion card)
    HDD : 10MB MFM (Seagate ST-412) (Type 1)
    Video : IBM Original EGA

    At Windows 3.1 (standard) minimum requirements seems to be following.

    DOS : MS-DOS (or IBM PC DOS) 3.10
    CPU : 80286
    RAM : 1MB
    HDD : 7-8MB of space






  • @human said:
    i have a cd rom version

    CDROM versions were never released by Microsoft as we know. So your version might be ''pirated''.

  • edited February 27

    @SomeGuy said:
    Windows 3.1 was never released on CD-ROM. If you have an ISO, it is fake garbage and we don't need it.

    That's true. Microsoft never did that. So it is a ''pirated'' version of it. Same thing goes with the fake ''Cougar'' version of Windows that some people think it's true.

  • @BetaTester24 said:
    Whats wrong with the archive files? They do not contain floppy disks, but when I opened two of them all the files that are likely parts of the floppies are already in the folder. Can anyone please help to install an archive file from here?

    Well some of these thingies are just the contents that are in the floppies. I don't know why. I'd suggest you to use the OEM version which is ''Windows 3.1 (OEM) (5.25-1.2mb)''

  • @JonathonWyble said:

    @SomeGuy said:
    Not all of the Windows 3.1 archives are in floppy disk image format as they should be. For those that are not, you must put all of the installation files in a single folder on your target hard drive or larger removable media and run setup from there.

    Are you saying that Windows 3.1 only works when it is in the floppy disk format? Because I have an ISO image for Windows 3.1, which is in a CD format, and it worked when I used that to install Windows 3.1 in VirtualBox.

    Well, you probably got that from YouTube tutorials, the CD-ROM versions did never exist so I suggest it's a ''pirated'' version. Probably someone made that CD because wanted the people to install Windows 3.1 in a quick way.

  • @val123039 said:

    @JonathonWyble said:

    @SomeGuy said:
    Not all of the Windows 3.1 archives are in floppy disk image format as they should be. For those that are not, you must put all of the installation files in a single folder on your target hard drive or larger removable media and run setup from there.

    Are you saying that Windows 3.1 only works when it is in the floppy disk format? Because I have an ISO image for Windows 3.1, which is in a CD format, and it worked when I used that to install Windows 3.1 in VirtualBox.

    Well, you probably got that from YouTube tutorials, the CD-ROM versions did never exist so I suggest it's a ''pirated'' version. Probably someone made that CD because wanted the people to install Windows 3.1 in a quick way.

    To be honest, I did get that ISO image for Windows 3.1 from someone on YouTube who made a video tutorial on how to install the OS in VirtualBox. So I guess it was sort of a "trick" for installing Windows 3.1 the "easy" way.

  • @JonathonWyble said:

    @val123039 said:

    @JonathonWyble said:

    @SomeGuy said:
    Not all of the Windows 3.1 archives are in floppy disk image format as they should be. For those that are not, you must put all of the installation files in a single folder on your target hard drive or larger removable media and run setup from there.

    Are you saying that Windows 3.1 only works when it is in the floppy disk format? Because I have an ISO image for Windows 3.1, which is in a CD format, and it worked when I used that to install Windows 3.1 in VirtualBox.

    Well, you probably got that from YouTube tutorials, the CD-ROM versions did never exist so I suggest it's a ''pirated'' version. Probably someone made that CD because wanted the people to install Windows 3.1 in a quick way.

    To be honest, I did get that ISO image for Windows 3.1 from someone on YouTube who made a video tutorial on how to install the OS in VirtualBox. So I guess it was sort of a "trick" for installing Windows 3.1 the "easy" way.

    Well, it was obvious that someone would upload an .ISO to install Windows 3.1 in the fastest way possible. I still preffer using floppy disks instead of a CD-ROM image. Most of these ISOs are found on tutorials about "How to install (insert software/OS here) on VirtualBox/VMware." Since installing an application or OS is way faster to install on VBox or VMware because you don't need a BIOS to make the system know that you have a CD-ROM driver. If you needed a BIOS, you'll need to make the system know manually if you have a CD-ROM driver or not.

  • @BetaTester24 said:
    Whats wrong with the archive files? They do not contain floppy disks, but when I opened two of them all the files that are likely parts of the floppies are already in the folder. Can anyone please help to install an archive file from here?

    Archives will probably contain all the files that the floppy diskette had. You'll need to use WinImage to create a diskette to place the files there.

    The archives that contain floppy disk files (such as .img or .ima format) are the ones that are labeled as "51/4 Floppy or 31/2 floppy" they contain the all the files on floppy disk format. You won't get on any trouble when installing them on a Hypervisor such as VirtualBox/VMware or PC Emulators such as PCem or 86Box.

  • edited August 29
    Alright. If you have a Windows 3.1 ISO, it is not official.

    As far as I know, compact discs did exist all the way back in the 80s (or maybe even earlier) but they weren't very popular. A good example of Microsoft software that was in compact discs in the 80s is Microsoft Bookshelf. Anyway, here is the link for the software here: https://winworldpc.com/product/bookshelf/87. As you can see, it was in compact disc format, and was released in 1987. First, many people didn't have a compact disc drive but they had a floppy diskette drive in 1992/1993. I'm pretty sure the "many people didn't have a compact disc" is why it wasn't on a RTM compact disc.

    Also, it is so easy to get Windows 3.1 on a ISO format because you can plop in each diskette in the drive, copy them to a folder, until you get to the last disk and run Setup and you will not need a diskette prompt. For example, they can just create a blank ISO and copy all the Windows 3.1 setup files onto it.
  • Taking a look at the Windows 3.0 downloads page, you'll notice this so I wouldn't rule out the possibility that some weird OEM or SDK/DDK/MDK versions came on CD ROMs.
  • edited August 29
    @ComputerHunter
    I was talking about non-OEM versions.
  • edited August 29
    Obviously an ISO version wouldn't exist. Maybe because people gave more attention to floppy drives. CDs on PCs would be a new concept for computers and multimedia.

    And the majority of computer users back on the 80s and 90s had floppy drives. But then, when some programs really needed way more space, they decided to use CDs, because they had more space.
  • @val123039 said:
    @BetaTester24 said:
    Whats wrong with the archive files? They do not contain floppy disks, but when I opened two of them all the files that are likely parts of the floppies are already in the folder. Can anyone please help to install an archive file from here?
    Well some of these thingies are just the contents that are in the floppies. I don't know why. I'd suggest you to use the OEM version which is ''Windows 3.1 (OEM) (5.25-1.2mb)''
    One use I can think of for the archives is for easier installation in DOSBox, which allows you to mount a folder like a disk image. It saves the user the trouble of having to rip files from the floppies themselves.
  • While Microsoft had never issued Windows 3.1 on CD-ROM in retail format, there are several LEGAL Windows 3.1 on CD-ROM via OEM, just like Windows 3.0a from Tandy:

    Sound Blaster multimedia upgrade kit (US English edition): https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/cd-sound-blaster-multimedia-upgrade-1824777519
    IBM (Japanese edition): http://blog.livedoor.jp/mshimohi/archives/826308.html
    Epson (Japanese edition): https://www.betaarchive.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=33374

    I own the Sound Blaster kit (that master disc + Microsoft Bookshelf 1992 + customized Panasonic CR-523-B); with some very minor customizations (e.g. including SB Jukebox in Accessories program group) it is virtually the same Windows 3.1, and technically the disc does not check whether your computer has a Sound Blaster or not.
  • The copy of build 68 here is fake.
  • CD-ROM drives were still relatively expensive. I bought my first computer with Windows 3.1 came out new. The cd-drive was expensive and had to wait a wile. On the surface, judging by the music industry, CD's were relatively cheap to manufacture, but not everyone could use them.

    My first outsource burn was 7575, so middle of October 1995. Part of the research involved using an OEM cdrom, that had ordinary DOS 6.22 and WfW 3,11 laid out on the cdrom. It was even at this time well understood how to transfer DOS and Windows from floppy disk to network install. Even PC-DOS 7. And this simply is what a cd-install is.

    The Multimedia PC standard included having a cdrom, and there is known to exist, a disk that has PC-DOS 5.00, Windows 3.10, the Win31 MME and OS/2 2.0 on it, as base installs. I've seen the disk described and the resulting output of it.

    My first cd burner was a 4x speed, that cost me 600$ at the time.

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