Windows 11

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  • edited July 4
    Windows 11 running on a 5 year old Intel NUC:



    ok, it's a VM... and it's slow as balls. But hey, it's running.
  • The system requirements seem absurdly high, but I guess Microsoft wants OEMs to sell more computers.

    I'm still using an i7-2600, and now apparently it's as old as a Pentium II to Microsoft. (Then again, if ACPI exists, Vista and 7 can hypothetically run on a Pentium II!)

    Good thing I've been running Debian with MATE for years.
  • edited July 5
    I'm still using an i7-2600, and now apparently it's as old as a Pentium II to Microsoft.


    Only 4 years to go until the 2600 is as old as a PII was when it was released.
  • @SomeGuy Actually, there is an arm64 Windows 11 compile that I've heard users are running on M1 macs.
  • Wha?

    I mean, I know Microsoft had an ARM version for some tablets and stuff, but are they actually planning on selling an ARM version for the Macintosh, or is this just something that will go the way of the DEC Alpha Windows 2000? (Which BTW, the DEC Alpha was a 64-bit CPU and everyone snubbed it back then because binary hardware compatibility was of critical importance, but I guess no one cares any more.)
  • Actually, MS has been adopting the "ARM for All" approach for a bit now. They have been producing arm64 compiles of Windows Server builds as well.
  • Turns out that if one's Windows 7 machine meets the system requirements, and wants to switch to Windows 11, it would have to be a clean install.

    Not really an "upgrade", is it? 🤨
  • And they are already torching the bridge to Windows 7 users. I'm expecting all of the Chromium-based browsers to stop updating soon, and Firefox will probably follow a while later.

    But support for anything older than four nanoseconds is immediately dropped and the users get screwed over.

    Considering the current state of the GPU market, I'll cling on to this machine for a good while.
  • @robobox How long have you had yours for? I've had mine for almost a decade, would you believe 🤯
  • Around 8 to 9 years, but it's in good shape.
  • Bought an el cheapo HP laptop with the amd ryzen 2200u and Win 10 Home - soon after it was made available. It had good specs for an entry level and I thought it would make an excellent beater laptop for my truck, esp once I installed Windows 7.

    Well fool me - Win 7 would not install, and it took days of asking and getting angrier, as I found out that amd does not present acpi to the Win 7 installer, effectively blocking it.

    Microsoft has endless ways it seems to me, to force people to conform to their world view.
  • https://www.howtogeek.com/744102/windows-11-makes-it-hard-to-change-your-default-web-browser/

    Well, this is a major turn-off... and if memory serves me, 10 was at it as well. Let's hope that change won't be final by the time it's released.
  • It's really easy to change it in 10. Windows 11 definitely does make it harder.
  • If they're going to keep it that way (and god forbid), a lot of people will be angry and this could drive many of them away.

    How many people in the world use Edge anyway? 🤷‍♂️
  • Other than power users, I'm guessing the vast majority of people won't care at all. You have to remember, users are dumb when it comes to IT things. They don't care about the same things you or I do.

    Other browsers like Chrome are going to have to either change the setting themselves, or dumb down the process for their users.

    As for how many people use Edge, apparently its market share is only 7% while Chrome's market share is almost 70%. I don't think Microsoft has escaped the bad rep they earned with Internet Explorer. Plus, a lot of sites that drop support for Internet Explorer often wind up recommending Chrome and providing a link to download it.

    Not only that, but Chrome is probably the default browser on most peoples phones if they're running Android. So when they go to try and get online with their Windows computer, they are probably looking for what they know, which is Chrome.
  • Well, seems that Firefox has found a way to bypass this new measure...

    It can set itself as your default browser, so you don't have to.
  • > Other browsers like Chrome are going to have to either change the setting themselves, or dumb down the process for their users.

    This is the issue though. The other browsers cant or aren't supposed to be able to change the settings themselves. I'm sure Microsoft will patch whatever workaround Firefox is using at the moment.
  • "I'm still using an i7-2600, and now apparently it's as old as a Pentium II to Microsoft. (Then again, if ACPI exists, Vista and 7 can hypothetically run on a Pentium II!)"

    highly doubtful of that.
    32bit Vista & Win7 could run on at least a 1Ghz Intel Pentium 3. definitely not Pentium 2s bcuz they're too "slow" and a far below the minimum cpu "speed" requirement
  • Just came across this, and thought I'd like to share it...

    If anyone wants to try out Windows 11 without having to install it and having to meet such stringent requirements, you can.

    I've tried out from this myself and it feels good, but it's a force of habit of moving the cursor to the bottom-right corner :D
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